Mortgage Software Solutions Blog

ABT Leads the Digital Transformation of the Mortgage Lending Industry

ABT Leads the Digital Transformation of the Mortgage Lending IndustryA laptop on the desk of a finance professional.

There is no slowing down for mortgage lenders in 2018.

Mortgage volume in the US is expected to grow and according to National Mortgage News, lenders increasingly view technology as a way to gain a competitive advantage in the growing market.

While some lenders embrace the efficiency that technology gives to the industry, a full 29% describe technology initiatives as a “necessary evil” of the industry.

Access Business Technology, a California-based fintech company, is determined to bring the industry up to speed and usher in the digital transformation of the mortgage industry.

ABT Deploys Quality Hardware & Software

Access Business Technologies (ABT) is a fintech consultant focused on technological advancement for the finance world. The company deploys both hardware and software meant to advance the technological capabilities of their clients.

For hardware, ABT deploys the Surface Pro armed with MS Office 365 for finance professionals who need the best tools for communication and collaboration. This combo provides a quality all-around foundation for finance-focused companies looking to standardize or reduce their device inventory.

ABT is also software developer with award-winning platforms created specifically for mortgage lenders. They have an array of software solutions for lenders that are up-and-running quickly while providing a seamless work environment for staff.

By working with a fintech expert like ABT, lenders save money and get a premium setup with premium service from a single channel.

ABT Provides Secure Cloud-Based Infrastructure

Quality software and hardware are not the only considerations for ushering in an age of technology in the mortgage industry.

Infrastructure also affects staffing. How can mortgage companies attract the best talent?

Flexjobs, a resource for remote workers, reports that workplace flexibility is becoming more important. From 2014 to 2017, the number of people who quit a job due to lack of flexibility has doubled.

Cue the new standard for business: the cloud-based work environment.

The cloud-based platforms that ABT offers to the world of fintech are a major solution to the increasingly remote work environment. Clients who migrate to the cloud don’t need to worry about scaring away talented finance professionals who demand flexibility.

Though the cloud is a relatively new requirement for finance companies, ABT has ensured that security is a first priority. ABT, with its finger on the pulse of the mortgage industry, has focused their fintech developments on cyber security and ensuring that data breaches are not a danger for their clients.

ABT provides cloud-based protection for Office 365 email from being hacked. ABT also provides a host of safeguards including multi-factor authentication, phishing protection on email, as well as encryption and security programs for lost or stolen devices.

ABT is the Mortgage Industry Tech Expert

With hardware, software, cloud-based infrastructure, and cyber security covered, ABT has set a new bar for fintech in financial institutions.

The push to remain at the cutting-edge of mortgage technology comes from an understanding of the industry. ABT knows that a quality tech setup gives lenders the ability to provide the best quality of service to customers.

ABT’s drive to develop quality solutions earned the company classification as a Microsoft Gold Level Partner. As a trusted developer for Microsoft solutions and the experience of deploying Office 365 in the mortgage industry, ABT is digitally enabling a newly mobile generation of mortgage workers.

Through integration and device support, ABT allows mortgage lenders to work even more flexibly and productively.

At the forefront of fintech, ABT hopes to continue the trend in the United States of increasing mortgage volumes by continuing to accelerate the industry along a full path of digital transformation.

To find out more about how ABT empowers financial professionals by using technology to transform the way they work, check out the Access Business Technologies blog.

Image: Unsplash

Topics: mortgage software integration multi-factor authentication cybersecurity mortgage documents security cloud storage productivity mortgage business data warehousing mobile technology Consumer Finance Protection Bureau Compliance Audit cloud-based data Housing Market Mortgage Lending

4 Ways Loan Management Software Improves the Mortgage Experience

4 Ways Loan Management Software Improves the MortFinancial management software makes everyday interactions smoother for mortgage lenders.

Mortgage software has relied on legacy infrastructures and paper processes for far too long.

In almost every other sector, interactions between banking institutions and customers have moved online.

Web-based transactions for commerce are increasing annually. In 2017, global e-retail sales amounted to 2.3 trillion U.S. dollars and projections show a growth of up to 4.48 trillion U.S. dollars by 2021.  As retail transactions migrate away from brick-and-mortar, the rest of the banking world plays catch up.

In the mortgage world, loan management software offers lenders high-tech solutions to keep them on the cutting edge of the finance world.

Here are the 4 ways that loan management software improves the mortgage experience.

  1. Centralized Access to Document Management

Cloud-based domain services store data on the cloud instead of on a localized server. This gives mortgage companies access to business-critical data from virtually anywhere. Office PCs, employee-owned laptops, and even mobile devices can capitalize on business opportunities anywhere that lenders are interacting with clients.

Loan management software like MortgageWorkSpace (MWS) offers a “portal” or single point of entry to all employees with internet access.

Users can synchronize their user settings and application settings data to the cloud, providing a unified experience across their devices and reducing the time needed for configuring a new device.

Lenders prefer the speed and breadth of information that online-based software provides. When lenders have quick access, customers get quick responses and customer service is perceived as fast and convenient.

Not only does this portal make remote work possible, but it keeps things secure as the mortgage industry embraces the remote working environment.

  1. Improved Security for Client Data

This single point of access protects company assets through multi-factor authentication, ensuring that data remains secure.

Further cyber security measures are managed using Windows Defender, an anti-malware component that keeps intrusions at bay for all devices joined to the MortgageWorkSpace network.

With MWS, there is a cloud-based firewall protecting the devices joined to your lending company’s network as well.

When security events do happen, this software gives the company the ability to remove company data from a mobile device or PC via remote access. This means that even if an employee’s device is stolen, the mortgage software keeps sensitive personal and financial information safe from hackers. 

  1. Effortless Compliance

Running parallel with cyber security, this software handles compliance regarding data security without needing to purchase, integrate, or maintain separate compliance software. MSW has what the industry calls “built-in” compliance features.

Other compliance issues faced by the mortgage industry are included in MSW. Documentation, record keeping, document expiration, and record retention are all features of this platform. This means that lenders using this software are always prepared for an audit without the last-minute scramble.

 In comparison to wider umbrella software, this platform is specifically built and maintained by developers who know the mortgage world.

Developed by California-based ABT, the company is an industry leader and watches the horizon for mortgage legislation that will affect their product’s performance. Lenders using MSW can be sure their software is not only up-to-date with compliance but that it will on boarding the most important finance trends as they happen.

  1. Integration Builds Capacity

Though compliance features are built-in, the platform remains flexible so that your lending company can utilize applications that give a competitive edge.

The Mortgage BI (business intelligence) dashboard powered by Microsoft gives unrivaled visibility to company data. This leads to data-based business decisions that improve the bottom line.

Analysis isn’t limited by this platform’s own BI capabilities though. MSW is vendor neutral so it integrates with loan origination systems, CRMs, Saas apps, on-premises networks, and plenty of proprietary software that makes business run more smoothly.

The days of paper-heavy processes for buying houses are numbered.

Developers are producing these sophisticated platforms that make the mortgage process better.

New financial management software is cloud-based, safe, and expandable. Customers can now enjoy a seamless experience thanks to platforms that give mortgage lenders speed and flexibility in their work.

Good software means agile lenders, which in turn means happy customers.

Does your mortgage company have outstanding software that improves this end-to-end experience?

MortgageWorkSpace is the award-winning business solution that mortgage lenders need. Learn more by visiting ABT.

Image: Unsplash

Topics: mobile device security email security data security phishing multi-factor authentication Business Intelligence cybersecurity Mortgage BI mortgage documents cloud storage productivity mortgage business mortgage industry cloud-based data Housing Market Mortgage Lending disaster recovery MBA

Why Mortgage Companies Need Built-In Compliance Tools

blog pic for Why Mortgage Companies Need Built-InBusiness data is available at your fingertips, but is it protected?

If your mortgage company isn’t talking about advanced data governance, you’ve missed the memo.

Mortgage companies around the world are facing 2018 with a regulatory backlash as a result of data breaches in the US and Europe.

Every company is scrambling to find the best cybersecurity options for financial data and figure out how to comply with stringent reporting regulations at the same time.

How can your mortgage company ensure that you are up-to-date with the newest industry standards in data governance?

Bolt-On vs. Built-In Data Governance

There are two types of compliance tools that financial institutions can use to follow the law.

Bolt-on refers to compliance tools that a business implements to interact with their existing computer-based financial systems.

Built-in refers to governance features that are part of the same computer system that they use to do their daily business activities including customer retention, storage, and database systems.

Bolt-on tools are a non-integrated option from the first wave of computer data compliance. Systems with built-in compliance features and built-in threat protection are the modern solution to meeting compliance standards.

Built-In Compliance Runs at the Speed of Business

The main issue with bolt-on tools is that they lack the visibility necessary to maintain compliance and keep moving at the pace of the company. For example, when working with outside vendors, mortgage companies are responsible for verifying vendor security.

The legal industry reports that using bolt-on tools can delay the on boarding of third-party vendors for up to 17 days and slow down overall revenue growth. Built-in options, due to being native to the system, move faster.

Built-ins can also coordinate with IT permissions on devices such as laptops and tablets used by third-party employees to access sensitive data. They offer high interactivity while bolt-on tends to offer single-process patches for cybersecurity issues.

As regulatory agencies push for never-before-seen requirements, bolt-on solutions don’t make financial sense anymore.

The True Cost of Built-On Compliance

Though switching to a new system is an investment, bolt-on solutions are actually more expensive in the end. The incremental investment is limitless; each new regulation requires a new patch.  

Instead, built-in systems work backwards by going all-in. They offer extreme security features that allow a company to scale back to the compliance limit.

Bolt-on solutions also cost man-hours. It creates busy work for employees who handle information instead of receiving a completed system report. When you factor in confusion and redundancy, the hours start to add up.

In the US, a time lag in reporting can mean trouble. New York State is blazing the trail for new cybersecurity regulations by mandating that mortgage companies have less than 72 hours to officially report a cyber attack or else face financial penalties.

With a built-in system, alerts are immediate and coverage is full from day one. Your financial services institution is protected from the risk associated with litigation and data breach.

Built-In Protection from Data Loss

ABT, a California-based company, has developed a platform for mortgage companies with built-in compliance tools called MortgageWorkSpace.

Systems like this take compliance out of employees’ hands and create strict policies that are enforced by the platform itself.

Since financial institutions are legally required to hold onto sensitive customer data for specific periods of time, a system like this allows the company to write the retention policy directly into the document management system. The system itself identifies, tags, and protects data for archive, even by custom query.

Integrated Security Features

Built-in systems have other data protection features that connect with employee activity.

For example, Felipe the Finance Director receives an email addressed from Ciara the COO but doesn’t notice that it isn’t from her company email address. Because the company email is integrated with the cybersecurity system, Felipe sees an alert that the sender’s email address is suspect and likely a phishing attempt.

Even if Felipe opens the email and clicks on an unsafe link, the system will take Felipe to a safe link where he is alerted again not to proceed. This type of security safety net is possible because built-in security can transparently see activity system-wide and isn’t limited to a single platform.

Built-in security tools helps catch phishing links, unsafe attachments, unsafe webpage links, malware, and spam so that breaches are prevented.

As data governance regulations increase in almost every global financial market, mortgage companies can remain compliant by implementing cybersecurity measures that are fast, transparent, complete, and save the company money in the long run.

The best way to meet these ever-rising regulations is to get outfitted with a platform that handles compliance as a built-in feature of the system.

MortgageWorkSpace is a business solution that allows mortgage companies to comply with full industry requirements regarding sensitive data. Learn more about cybersecurity for mortgage companies by visiting ABT.

Image: Unsplash

Topics: Mortgage Servicing in the Cloud Access Business Technologies MortgageExchange cyber security information security for mortgage companies DeviceGuardian MortgageWorkSpace data security mortgage company security financial data security multi-factor authentication Business Intelligence cybersecurity mortgage industry cloud-based data Housing Market

What Technology Is Changing In Banking For 2018

blog pic 4In the future, financial information and programming will be increasingly available on-the-go.

The old days of purely brick-and-mortar banks are over.

Mobile banking is the preferred platform as global smartphone use skyrockets and our preference for handheld interaction grows.

In 2011 only 10% of the world’s population used a smartphone. By 2018, that number has reached over 36% penetration.

From traditional commercial banks to finance technology or “fintech” startups, the banking industry is competing in an all-out sprint towards digital progress.

Here are 4 ways that technology is changing the banking industry in 2018.

  1. Open Banking

Open banking is a phenomenon being pushed by regulatory bodies around the world.

Lawmakers in the EU, UK, and the US have all passed legislation that takes personal financial data out of the hands of the banks and returns control to consumers.

The EU’s Payment Services Directives (PSD 2007 and PSD2 2015) will be fully implemented this year.

Together the PSDs regulate financial service providers by requiring transparency about consumer rights and the banks’ obligations to the public. They also require banks to free up customer data for third party access, limiting the power of the bank that gathered it.

The EU regulations coincide with the “Open Banking revolution” in the United Kingdom that intends to make banking more competitive for increased consumer protection. The UK also made it mandatory for all banks to provide third-party access to customer financial data using open API technology at the start of 2018.

In the wake of the Equifax data breach on the other side of the Atlantic, the United States made their move towards stricter regulations beginning in 2017 with the state of New York. US laws are focused on cybersecurity and consumer protection via speedy cyber attack reporting and increased government oversight of consumer data mishandling.

The proximity of these launch dates mean that traditional banks around the world face new technology-based limitations. Open banking and cyber security requirements leave the door open for tech-savvy challengers with a spotless reputation for safeguarding the public.

  1. RegTech

Another technology changing global banking in 2018 is regulation technology or “RegTech”.

RegTech is the umbrella term for software tools specifically designed to streamline regulatory compliance.

In the EU, RegTech has been using guidelines from the 2004 and 2011 Markets in Financial Instruments Directives (MiFID) as well as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) of 2014.

Newly developed RegTech takes new 2018 regulations into account and eliminates duplication issues and insufficient data storage signposting.

Due to increased regulation, the adoption of these programs across the industry will determine which finance organizations move ahead and which ones get stuck hitting every legal bump in the road.

If implemented well, RegTech has the potential to significantly reduce risk, speed up compliance management, and control bank costs despite increased accountability.

  1. Robo Advice

“Robo advice” is the term for technology that does traditionally human jobs in investment banking.

In the past, investment managers evaluated a customer’s financial situation, communicated investment options, assessed risk appetite, handled portfolios according to client preferences, and relayed information about performance back to the investor.

Robo advice is the software and algorithms that provide these services digitally and accessibly on mobile devices like smartphones and tablets.

Millennials aged 22-37 prefer to work with apps and digital information over commercial banks. The demographic has a do-it-yourself attitude and shows an aversion to traditional banking institutions that have steered them into crushing student debt.

In fact, 75% of American millennials report trusting a financial product from a fintech company. Almost half of millennials in the US with investments report being aware of robo-advisors, while a full 11% currently use a robo-advisor exclusively.

With a frictionless user experience, robo advice may become the new norm.

  1. New Technology

In the UK, financial services newcomers are edging out traditional banks. Startup lenders like Iwoca in the UK are touted as the “future of small business lending” by using software algorithms to make credit decisions and having quick loan turnaround thanks to fintech.

By using all-digital or hybrid platforms combining human and algorithmic tools to reach customers, other digitally-native finance startups are slated to follow their lead.

Whether it’s anti-monopoly Open Banking APIs, intelligent RegTech software to handle compliance, or the growing preference for robo advice over human interaction, technology is making huge waves in the global banking industry this year.

As the digitally-native generations grow, traditional financial institutions scramble to expand their digital offerings while fintech startups flourish and join the market.

Join us at the cutting edge of technology with regulation-compliant cyber security, remote device access, and more. ABT equips mortgage lenders with the tools for success in a digital world.

Image: Visual Hunt

Topics: millennials cloud storage mortgage business mortgage regulations mobile technology mortgage industry Consumer Finance Protection Bureau Compliance Audit job opportunity cloud-based data Trump Administration Housing Market Mortgage Lending

How New York’s Latest Cyber Security Law Will Impact You

sgfhj.jpgNew cyber security laws in New York mean strict accountability for businesses.

Cyber security is on the brink of an unprecedented crackdown in New York.

The finance industry is preparing for a new normal that looks vastly more stringent than before.

Part reaction to consumer outrage and part finger-pointing to the market for accountability when it comes to data breaches, the regulation titled Cybersecurity Requirements for Financial Services Companies (2017) is a broad re-draw of the rules by the state regulator.

In a country where the sector has historically played fast and loose with handling missteps, all eyes are watching to see how quickly it can adapt to the new normal.

As everyone settles in for the ride, industry insiders are already forming hypotheses about how far this new regimentation will reach.

Laying Down the Law

The new law outlining consumer data security measures in New York State is the first of its kind in the United States.

Officially released in March of 2017 with a built-in year of lag time, the enforcement date has arrived. As of Thursday February 15, 2018 enforcement is in full effect.

Financial institutions are expected to have stepped up their game in safeguarding computer systems and the sensitive information stored inside. A full guide to the highly prescriptive requirements can be found here.

The end goal is to avoiding security breaches by making businesses sufficiently fearful of repercussions. If they do foster an environment that allows for future problems or leaks of personal data, the stakes are high.

Who the Law Affects

The current law has been interpreted to include all banking, insurance, lending, and mortgage brokerage firms that are operating in New York. Every company under that heading will be held to the new standard.

This means that entities must get in gear to assess their actual and potential cybersecurity risks and make a solid plan to mitigate them.

The good news for IT departments is that due to the highly detailed guidelines about policy and the use of technology to patch up the security gaps, they have rather exact instructions to follow.

Beyond State Lines

At first glance, companies outside of New York might assume they have been spared from the harshest regulations in the country. After a closer look, it seems imminent that the change will have a wide-ranging impact.

Going forward, consumers will rely on their financial institutions to keep personal data safe. Not only are the expectations high, but the safety net sets the stage for demanding the same in other states.

Mortgage companies across the country are targeted by hackers due to the quantity of information and the quality of its use for fraud purposes. Companies outside of New York in the same industry should brace for the arrival of comparable laws on their home turf.  

Out-of-state entities with branches in New York should have a response as well, even before their own states begin drafting something similar.

In fact, other states are already following suit. Colorado and Vermont introduced their own measures within months after the NY regulation was put in place.

Vermont’s law names “securities professionals” as the intended subjects of its tighter regulations. Without specifying banks, the use of this broad term leaves the door open for enforcement with entities that may not previously fall under the state’s traditional regulation agencies.

As a global financial hub, even entities doing business in New York should consider getting the jump on re-assessing their policies as a continuity plan.

Beyond the Finance World

The effect of intensified scrutiny over cyber security practices will logically spill over to third-parties who work in the finance world and businesses who directly manage cyber security for the industry.

Fortune magazine goes one step further, predicting that ripple effect will go well beyond the financial industry. It could cover security events by any business that stores personal data “from point-of-sale to payroll providers.”

After that, it seems the industry shake-up will likely bleed into any major industry that houses consumer data using any sort of technology. These days, companies who aren’t keeping customer information in a computer system are few and far between.

The only thing the industry seems sure of is how this trend in accountability will not be contained by state lines or by industry.

In the early days of this new law’s enactment, the extent of this chain reaction is yet to be seen.

Over the next fiscal year, New Yorkers will lead the way, with countless gazes focused on them for cues of how to adapt.

ABT’s cloud-based portal MortgageWorkSpace adds banking level security to email, servers, PC’s and mobile devices in the mortgage industry. Contact us to learn more.

Image: VisualHunt.com

Topics: Compliance Due Diligence cyber security mortgage company security financial data security cybersecurity mortgage business mortgage industry Consumer Finance Protection Bureau Compliance for Mortgage Companies Compliance Audit cloud-based data Mortgage Lending 23 NYCRR Part 500 NYSDFS network safety

Business Data Security and Multi-Factor Authentication

 240_F_122590781_AfHycyjOI0sOqepiZ1DQVBYkZsH7qlRr.jpg Get an extra level of security with multi-factor authentication or MFA.

Each year, cybersecurity gets more complicated.

According to anti-virus developer Panda Security, the amount of malware created by cybercriminals is predicted to grow exponentially with each passing year.

Companies have to face the reality that a security breach has a serious impact on business.

To avoid the distress of company-wide damage control and a PR nightmare, it’s best to make sure security is in good shape.

Real Business Impact

For some businesses, consumer data handling is the main issue.

Financial institutions such as banks and mortgage companies are often targeted by hackers because they house the most personal information.

With major security failures like the Equifax breach of 2017 making international news, the finance industry’s cybersecurity worries are real.

More is at stake than information. A data breach can mean sales losses and a tarnished reputation that lasts for years.

From fines to fraud, there are monetary repercussions as well.

So what is the fastest way to tighten security on cloud-based and traditional networks?

Multi-Factor Authentication

Data breaches in single-factor authentication systems often exploit the system login credentials or passwords of users.

Multi-factor authentication or MFA is a group of security measures that go beyond the traditional password in order to correctly identify a person for system access.

MFA is becoming more prevalent in the financial industry. This kind of authentication was adopted by the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PSI DSS) in February of 2017 and was listed as a standard for the mortgage industry in the State of New York in the same year.

Multiple factors mean heightened levels of information that only the user can provide.

These factors can be a number of different security measures. A “soft token” is when security software generates a one-time-use passcode sent to the user’s mobile device. This type of authentication can also be executed with a text message, phone call, or an email with a hyperlink.

Other factors run the gamut from predefined security questions to biometric identifiers like fingerprints or facial recognition software.

Only the correct user knows the information or is in the circumstance to receive the passcode, so using MFA means only the approved user is given access.

The Modern Office

Another issue with security is the modern office environment.

There are a growing number of remote workers. Employees want access to work-related applications from outside the office.

In this mobile workforce, employees are moving off of network-approved computers and onto personal or public machines. It’s up to the IT department to facilitate their work and make sure they go through a heightened level of security checks.

MFA is an authentication strategy that allows IT to deliver this level of remote access. It solves the problem of identifying recognized employees while maintaining a solid defense against intruders.

User Experience

The final consideration when implementing cybersecurity measures is user experience.

With higher scrutiny comes a higher level of annoyance by the employee at having to prove their authorization.

IT staffers need to balance security measures with user convenience.

One development that improves this balance is “adaptive” MFA. This security technology evaluates the risk factor of the user and then adapts the number of factors required for entry to the system.

An employee using a company-issued laptop at a café with an IP address across the street from headquarters is considered a low-risk access attempt. This situation does not require extra security measures.

On the other hand, if someone is trying to gain access on an unrecognized device in a location where the company doesn’t have an office (e.g. employee is attempting to do work on her tablet while vacationing in Bali) then the number of factors required will be at the maximum level. The employee jumps through some hoops, but with an understanding of why.

Conclusion

Data breaches are happening at the enterprise level at an alarming rate. A watchdog organization called Breach Level Index estimates that every second, an average of 57 records are stolen.

Employees are moving towards a more mobile work environment with wide geographic distribution.

For companies who handle consumer data, implementing MFA is simply one of the most effective ways to crack down on security violations and keep up with the modern workplace.

Businesses that use the MortgageWorkspace management software by ABT are protected by multi-factor authentication and a host of other cybersecurity measures. Contact us to learn more.

Topics: social networking safety phishing multi-factor authentication cloud storage mortgage business Compliance for Mortgage Companies Compliance Audit cloud-based data Housing Market Mortgage Lending

Solid Steps to Safeguard Against Meltdown and Spectre

ghjfj.jpgTwo defects threaten computers and devices released on the market since 1995.

Meltdown and Spectre are the names given to two newly-discovered bugs terrorizing computers around the world.

At the sound of such unnerving names, it’s hard for security folks at enterprise-level companies to control the panic.

While protocols for dealing with these threats are still on the drafting board, there are solid steps that companies can take to protect themselves.

What are Meltdown and Spectre?

In early January of 2018, the tech world was rocked by the discovery of two colossal security flaws that affect almost every computer and smart device on the market since 1995.

First announced on January 3rd, the bugs’ initial discoveries are being attributed to Jann Horn at Project Zero, a Google-based program for security analysis.

These two separate flaws were simultaneously being probed and announced by a handful of security experts from around the globe. As bits and pieces came out about the exposures, the gravity of the situation became clearer.

Both Meltdown and Spectre exploit weakness in the CPU of most current machines and all their predecessors dating back to 1995.

Since both faults affect major brand-name processors, it means that desktops, laptops, mobile devices, and servers all contain the defects.

The spooky truth is that they affect a majority of computers in use today.

How They Work

Often linked due to the widespread nature of both flaws and the fact that they were discovered around the same time, they do not work in the same way.

The first defect, Meltdown, is named for what it does to affected devices. It sort of ‘melts’ the wall between applications and the machine’s OS and makes it a devastating entryway for hackers.

The second issue, Spectre, is a named for the process from which hackers are able to steal information—namely ‘speculative execution’.

Speculative execution is the technique whereby your device records your computer activity in an attempt to predict future actions. This process helps your device execute tasks quickly, but the records contain sensitive usage information that shouldn’t fall into the wrong hands.

The name also refers to an apparition, which is fitting since companies don’t want intruders ghosting around their private information.

Meltdown affects Intel processors while Spectre affects three kinds of CPU chip: Intel, AMD, and ARM.

Using these newly discovered gateways, popular tech forum Bleeping Computer says, “Malicious program can steal passwords, account information, encryption keys, or theoretically anything stored in the memory of a process.”

Vendors React

In response to the potential devastation, the tech community has seen a wave of security advisories and patches to deal with the bugs.

At the pace that vendors are trying to get information out, some have produced conflicting stories: While AMD maintains that its CPUs have a near zero risk of vulnerability, Microsoft quickly pushed out a patch for AMD devices that has caused computers to stop working.

In the haste to calm the masses, it seems some solutions come with problems of their own.

Beyond the CPU

Browsers are also vulnerable due to these glitches.

Safari came out with a patch in December of 2017 while Microsoft just released patches for IE and Edge. Microsoft announced that Windows 10 is safer to use than older versions, but did not provide further details.

After other vendors bumbled, Google reneged on a patch that was promised for January 23rd. Google’s Chrome browser and OS patch came out Friday the 2nd of February, over a week late.

Adding yet another layer to this confusing frenzy, Anti-Virus programs may be incompatible with some systems (notably Microsoft) so don’t go AV-crazy just yet.

In order to be proactive, here are three solid steps you can take to make sure your company is protected.

  1. Assess Your Risk

Guidelines for action from patches to future fixes are available at each vendor’s site. Your company can build a customized response based on vendor-specific information.

  1. Follow Instructions

Take the recommended steps to mitigate any security risks that would leave your company vulnerable.

A smorgasbord of vendors, from Amazon to Cisco, has released advisories to protect their clients and business partners from dangerous activity.

It’s up to your company’s security team to follow instructions based on the software and hardware that your system uses.

  1. Hold Out for More Information

Unfortunately, these bugs were publicly announced recently. The scramble to provide permanent answers is on.

The best thing to do after the initial patch scare is to await further details and instruction from the tech security community.

Businesses protected by ABT’s monitoring service Network Guardian receive monthly reports detailing security threats. Contact us to learn more.

Image: VisualHunt.com

Topics: mortgage documents mortgage business mortgage industry cloud-based data Mortgage Lending disaster recovery malware network intel spectre meltdown network safety

Three Key Levels of Mortgage BI

3 Key Levels of Morgtgage BI

 

Managing mortgage data can be incredibly difficult as more and more information is linked to an ever-evolving market. Mortgage BI, a cloud-based business analytics service, can reduce stress involved with implementing a better information-organizing strategy, as it lowers overhead involved in business analysis. This is ideal because it helps increase team productivity by making the most useful information the most visible.

Why hire an outside team of analysts who will be using the mortgage software now available? This data serves an important role in highlighting a company's strengths and weaknesses and is accessible now.

The data is out there, however the tools for accessing it must present organized operational and market analytic metrics based on current market behavior. This is what effective use of Mortgage BI is all about - providing companies with a perspective on management capability and strategy. As each company objective is different, it is critical to know how to do this as it applies individually. While one organization may be in niche real estate markets, others might need mainstream commercial property live data.  Solutions that include an option for access through mobile devices are also essential, assuring that top-level data is always accessible and--more important--usable by CEOs and upper-level management. Management for cloud and hybrid cloud solutions is also a viable need for companies looking to maximize use of data.

Mortgage BI gives companies several essential powerful intelligence levels:

  1. Unique Data

All data that is unique to the specific individual using the software including lending history and other unique assets. Operational data will fall under this and the aggregate data classification. Appraisal volumes, vendor fees and vendor quality can be neatly organized here. Software that takes cognitive fit into consideration is especially important here. The better the fit, and more relevant the data, the more engaged staff will be.

  1. Aggregate Data

Mortgage BI, as it pertains to a lending groups, includes company spreadsheets and statistics. This market data needs to offer refined strategic insights at the aggregate and comparative level. Here the company as a whole is represented, with only the most applicable pieces of data brought together to form a big-picture view for decision makers.

  1. Comparative Analysis

This is a level of data that compares individual data to that of their peers, enabling mortgage companies to better position themselves with their competition. This can also be arranged to provide a view for the specific company's data in comparison to a larger market data set. This level of data was made available at a zip-code level in January 2008. Filters based on mortgage provider and sales performance are invaluable for crafting executive company decisions. Comparing performance across several different markets can also create more realistic or competitive KPIs. This is a CEO-level must for strategical planning.

Simply put, Mortgage BI should also put an emphasis on communication tools. This truly humanizes the process of effective decision making. How so? Individuals involved in brokering deals and reviewing mortgage measures are able to gauge progress and results of specific and ongoing projects. People will be able to visualize their contributions. The mortgage market is filled with information such as vendor performance metrics, production reports, foreclosure, and depreciation measures. There is no longer a need for stacks of notebooks and piles of printouts of these reports and spreadsheets. Mortgage BI organizes tasks for maximum accessibility, dividing tasks into functions like origination, servicing, and REO,all of which drive business decisions.

All data and communication tools are also designed according to compliance and regulation measures. In addition to providing mortgage management companies the option to review data by up-to-date market data, everyday management also becomes more streamlined, saving time and money.  

As the housing market becomes more complex to navigate it’s important to take advantage of the useful solutions out there. As with all Mortgage BI, businesses can focus on closing loans and increasing productivity while reducing the amount of troubleshooting inherent within data analysis. Access Business Technologies also uses technology to provide an extra layer of performance assessment to managers. We also specialize in integrating mortgage BI systems from the ground up.

To learn more about Mortage BI solutions, please contact us. We are your resource for cloud-based mortgaga data management.

Topics: Access Business Technologies mortgage data management cloud-based data